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Alaska and Back – Exploring the Pacific Coast and its Treasures

by Amanda and Barry Glickman on 11 Feb
Alaska and Back – Exploring the Pacific Coast and its Treasures Bluewater Cruising Association
Barry and Amanda love high latitude sailing and in 2013 headed north along with Admiral Salty Dog, their Labrador retriever, to explore Southeastern Alaska. They were on the hunt for the usual – glaciers, whales, and white bears, but they became fascinated by the geology.

The comparatively new mountains with the violent volcanic upthrusts of Foggy Bay, the ancient fossils of Naukati, and the garnets of Wrangell were a staunch contrast to the weathered coastline and low growing shrubs of their experiences in the far south of Patagonia. Together, they would like to share their experiences, high points and low points, and help prepare you for your own voyage north!



Amanda and Barry have been sailing together since 1997. After sailing the Sea of Cortez following John Steinbeck’s book “The Log of the Sea of Cortez”, they embarked on a voyage to circumnavigate South America, following the route of Darwin, backwards. Their destinations included the Galapagos, Easter Island, Cape Horn (where they lived for 2 years), Antarctica, Isla de los Estados, and the Falkland Islands. They’ve circumnavigated the Black Sea, sailed the Eastern Med, where they found Papa Rumba and cruised Greece, Italy and Malta, before dragging her home to BC to continue exploring this amazing coast. They worked together at the University of Victoria, retiring recently and now calling Cortes Island their home.

This article has been provided courtesy of the Bluewater Cruising Association.

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