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Go and get shagged (at the SICYC Vice Commodore’s Rendezvous for 2017)

by Evan Johnston on 16 Apr
Shag Islet CYC burgee at the Cocos Keeling Islands Shag Islet Cruising Yacht Club
Shag Islet Cruising Yacht Club I hear you ask? Well for those who don’t know, it’s the fastest growing club in Australia, and possibly the world. SICYC has been in existence for seven years, and has over 5500 members spread across 17 countries. It doesn’t own property, and is not in competition with mainstream yacht clubs, as many members belong to various other yacht clubs. SICYC was recently the focus of the Channel 7 TV program, ‘Creek to Coast’, across Australia.

To maintain our exclusively nonexclusive concept of boaties of all walks of life having fun, all members of SICYC, or ‘Shaggers’ as they are colloquially called, become ‘Vice Commodores’ on joining, and also share the very same membership number. I’m Vice Commodore, Southern Moreton Bay Islands, and my wife Helen is Vice Commodore, Cobby Cobby Island. The burgee depicts ‘flag officer’ status for all! SICYC burgees are seen everywhere in Australia, and also around the world, wherever cruising yachties congregate.



SICYC has developed into a social network for like-minded boaties who get together, share stories, experiences and enjoy a drink or two. This becomes a bit of an ‘assistance network’ for the cruising world. The SICYC hold multiple social events throughout the year, both in Australia and around the world for fun, with the spin off being fund raising.

So why not join the SICYC? You can then be part of the fun, enjoy the company of fellow cruisers, and also come to the 2017 rendezvous. Joining is simple, just complete your application online at website. For only $65 you’ll receive a club shirt, become a life member, and you too can enjoy the benefits of a fantastic fraternity on the water.



Many of our members fall in the prostate cancer age bracket, and so therefore the Prostrate Cancer Foundation of Australia (PCFA) has become our charity of choice. Last year, the proceeds from the four-day Rendezvous alone amounted to over AU$105,000, which was handed over to the PCFA. More than $500,000 has now been raised for Prostate Cancer research over the preceding years, and the total is climbing.

Where’s Shag Islet? Shag Islet is a tiny islet in the Gloucester Passage, at the top end of the Whitsunday Islands. It’s about the size of a football field, has nothing on it except a flag pole, but it is well worth of official recognition by all who attended. It’s just off Montes Reef Resort on the mainland.



Every year, as many ‘Shaggers’ as possible get together on the last weekend in August to hold a rendezvous of fun and frivolity. This year’s rendezvous will be between the 24th and 27th August, with anchorages off both Montes Reef Resort and the Gloucester Resort on either side of Shag Islet. Holding is good over a sandy bottom, and there is plenty of room for everyone. This year we expect more than 200 boats (power and sail), with approximately 1000 people to take part. Don’t worry about arriving early, as the fun ashore starts when you arrive. ‘Early Bird’ activities will commence on Tuesday 23 August at both Cape Gloucester and Montes Reef Resort.

On the 24th August there will be a ‘Meet and Greet’, complete with crab auctions and crab races, plus live entertainment, dancing and meals on the beach from 4.30pm.



Ever tried to cram 1000 people onto a football field sized islet while hosting a sausage sizzle, plus dancing amongst the rocks to fabulous music? Well on the 26th August the annual Shag Islet Party will start at 11.30 am, with live entertainment. Blue shirts everywhere and fun filled boaties having a ball! That evening it’s back ashore for more music and fun.



But wait the fun still goes on! The 27th August will see us host ‘Hold Hands Across the Blue’ for Prostate Cancer at 12 noon. What’s this you ask? Well everyone is invited to hop in their dinghy, take drinks and nibbles, then assemble in the shape of the Prostate cancer Foundation of Australia logo. Live entertainment on the super yacht, Norseman, beams across the assembled dinghies, and it’s a great afternoon. Ever tried to dance in your dinghy? Many of us have, and subsequently failed at the ‘Hands across the Blue’



That evening, THE MAIN EVENT takes place at Montes Reef Resort. It’s ‘Come as you were when the ship went down’ party, where the best-dressed wins a prize. This will be a fun night with a group beach photo of everyone present. There are also auctions, raffle draws, plus fireworks from the beach. Again the courtesy boats will be operating to and from the anchorages.



Still not partied out? Well on the 28th we have the famous annual Pirates Parley. This is the farewell event and is not to be missed, for there is a lot happening. So dress in pirate theme, again there will be prizes for the best-dressed pirate and pirate queen. Lunch will be taken care of with pig on the spit (maybe pigs on spits given the numbers attending). Further raffles and auctions will take place in support of PCFA throughout the day, with celebrities walking the plank in true pirate fashion.

The final event will be the announcement of Funds raised for Prostate Cancer Awareness and Research during the rendezvous.



As an added attraction the SICYC ‘Parrothead Radio’ will broadcast on FM throughout the Rendezvous, to provide great music and information. So what else is happening during these fun packed four days? There will be prizes awarded for the ‘best-dressed’ boat by day and by night. Local area helicopter flights are available, with optional special flights to reef destinations. Jet ski tours and fishing tours will round out the activities.

There you are, the 2017 SICYS Rendezvous is well in hand. Come and be part of this great event. It’s bigger than Hamilton Island and Airlie Beach race weeks, and you don’t have to own a racing yacht! Especially after Cyclone Debbie!






North Technology - Southern SparsBarz Optics - San Juan Worlds Best EyewearPredictWind.com 2014

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