Please select your home edition
Edition
GJW Direct 2020

SF's Pier 39 Marina joins Emeryville & Alameda Marinas' fight against pollution with Ocean Vacuums

by Mary Lou 15 Jul 2019 14:57 UTC
Seabin Project © Mary Lou

Seabin Project, the Aussie innovation that's tackling marine plastic pollution and educating the next generation of ocean savers, installed a new Seabin in the Pier 39 Marina Thursday, July 11th. This is the area where families gather to watch the sea lions. Why is this so important?

The Seabin is a device created to reduce, and ultimately eliminate pollution in our oceans. Seabins act as a trash can for our waters and have the ability to remove microplastics, microfibers, plastic bags, bottles, cigarette butts and more. You should see what people throw into our waterways. Many people are not familiar with the direct link between climate change and marine plastic pollution. But, out of the 320 million metric tons of new plastic mass-produced each year - almost all from oil - 8 million tons leak into the world's oceans and waterways. Youv'e seen the Great Pacific Garbage Patch? At last sampling there were 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic in the patch that weigh an estimated 80,000 tons. Since Seabin Project was co-founded by Andrew Turton and Pete Ceglinski, two avid ocean lovers, there have been Seabins installed in over 40 countries. What does this mean? Each day, a total of 1.95 tons of waste is extracted from our oceans. (Learn more about their innovative technology here.)

But Seabin Project doesn't just stop with cleaning up our oceans. Their mission is to live in a world where the Seabin technology is not necessary, so they have dedicated their time to educate communities across the world about how to fight the plastic pandemic through concepts of reactive + preventative solutions and implementing Ocean Plastic STEM learning programs. (Learn more about Seabin's education programs here.)

Seabins were installed in the Emeryville Marina and Alameda's Ballena Isle Marina in December of 2017, as their marina management company, Safe Harbor, participated in the Seabin Project's global pilot study, and continues to install Seabins in all the marinas they manage. Pier 39 Marina's Seabin is expected to remove 3 tons of marine pollution from San Francisco waters by end of 2019

Some Numbers:

  • Total number of Seabins installed worldwide: 719
  • Number of plastic bags that one Seabin can collect each year: 90,000
  • Number of plastic bottles that one Seabin can collect each year: 11,900
  • Total amount of marine litter captured to date: 114,916 kg (over the last 2.5 years)
  • Total amount of marine litter captured each day: 1,952.33 kg

Here's how it all started. Two life-long surfer friends from Australia, appalled by the plastic and debris pollution in our waters, set out to clean up the ocean. They wanted to create a garbage bin that would collect the floating plastic. This got them started cleaning up the marine environment, one marina at a time. How? With the V5 Seabin, a floating vacuum filter device they invented that works like an ocean vacuum 24/7 continuously collecting floating debris - plastic bottles, paper, oil, fuel, detergent and more. Over two years Seabin Project co-founders Pete Ceglinski and Andrew Turton secured partners for a pilot study into the effectiveness of the seabin and now the Seabin Project has evolved into a comprehensive research, educational and technology initiative with worldwide reach, including educational tools for students to get on board. The Seabin Project team believes that each child that learns to dispose of litter properly will grow to be one less source person for pollution of our oceans and waterways. Currently, according to Jambeck Research, 8.1M tons of mismanaged waste enters our oceans every year.

Here's how it works:

  • The seabin is installed in a specific problem debris area, attached to a dock.
  • Water is filtered from the surface and passed through a catch bag inside the Seabin, powered by a submersible water pump.
  • Water is then pumped back into the water leaving the litter and debris trapped in the catch bag. Larger pieces of plastic may attach themselves to the bin.
  • Marina operators need to empty the catch bag at least twice a day, as it holds up to two pounds.

What are you doing to reduce your own plastic consumption? Make a climate action promise today!

Related Articles

Long journey home
Hundreds of anxious sailors are preparing to make dangerous voyages home across the Atlantic With a 3,600-mile non-stop solo sail across the Atlantic ahead of him, Garry Crothers is a little anxious. But he has to get moving before the hurricane season. “I'm in a bad place here, I don't have any choice,” he says. Posted on 14 May
Mismatch between land and seafloor debris revealed
Research showed general mismatch between what is located on shorelines and what remains on seafloor Statistical analysis by CSIRO scientists suggests that buoyancy, as well as the tendency to snag, most closely predicts whether an item found on the beach will also appear under the water. Posted on 7 May
On hold under lockdown in New Zealand
All voyages, passages and plans are off Please wait here...this sign appeared weeks ago at the local grocery store and it sums up our time in a New Zealand marina under Covid-19 lockdown measures. All voyages, passages and plans are off. Posted on 27 Apr
The great Caribbean shut down
Coronavirus has proved to be a world-changing event Like most of you I am sitting on my boat, not where I thought I would be at this time, somewhat in limbo, with no idea if anything is going to change in the coming weeks, or where we might be welcome. Posted on 20 Apr
The 5 capes Seaburban around alone
Solo sailor and non-stop using only traditional navigational tools Gabriola Island resident Bert ter Hart is hoping to be the first North American to complete a single-handed, non-stop West-about circumnavigation via the five Southern Great Capes using only traditional non-electronic navigational tools. Posted on 18 Apr
The world-first 'cloud brightening' technology
SIMS and Southern Cross University successfully trialled world-first 'cloud brightening' technology As the world grapples with COVID-19, the Great Barrier Reef is facing a crisis of its own - its third mass bleaching in five years. Posted on 18 Apr
Calling all boat bimblers!
Show us what you've been up to this winter, or are doing now! If you have spent the winter engrossed in boat DIY, whether it was small modifications or massive rebuilds, Sail-WorldCruising.com would love to hear from you. We think it's time to share your story with the world. Posted on 29 Mar
University of Gothenburg ice research
Floating ice walls partly deflect warm ocean currents The research was led by the University of Gothenburg and used data and research from CSIRO. Floating ice walls - the edge of the floating ice shelf - are connected to landmass. Icebergs detach from ice shelves to join the ocean. Posted on 2 Mar
Good news from the Maldives
Clearance costs are set to reduce substantially Historically a country that favored land-based tourists more than those arriving on their own keel, Maldives clearance costs are set to reduce substantially from 1st April, 2020 in an effort to make this island group more cruiser/sailor friendly. Posted on 29 Feb
Passage season from Panama across the Pacific
Some important changes to note this year Passage season from Panama across the Pacific is upon us with the Galapagos, French Polynesia and Pacific islands gearing up for the seasonal influx of yachts. Posted on 27 Feb
Upffront 2020 Foredeck Club SW FOOTERVaikobi 2019AUG - Footer 1Highfield Boats - Sailing - FOOTER