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Marine Resources 2019 - Leaderboard

S/V Nereida sails around the world - Day 333: Mostly very light winds again but better direction

by Jeanne Socrates 2 Sep 2019 04:57 UTC
S/V Nereida sails around the world © Jeanne Socrates

Saturday 4pm PDT (2300GMT) - A lovely sunny day with plenty of blue sky although looks as though some clouds will be coming over soon. Just had a late lunch on deck - of crackers and the last of some blue cheese - very mature!

Speed is only around 2kt, despite full sail - wind is not even enough to make the wind generator turn very fast.

Can just make out the misty outline of the mountains below clouds over Vancouver Island ahead - makes landfall coming up seem that much more real.

Clearing up in the galley and then I'll try getting to the radio tuner and antenna connections hidden away behind the aft cabin woodwork.....

7pm - Peaceful, gentle, pleasant... All those... but we're drifting S-SSE now on port tack - just over 1.5kt - not exactly fast - half normal slow walking speed...! Hoping wind will back further so we make better Easting. Very quiet with almost no wind in sails and rigging. Wind generator turning, but rather slowly.

Lovely sunny evening - tempted to have a small sundowner in celebration of seeing land - Vancouver Island's mountains.

Propane supply just ran out to galley - so using back-up camping style stove in lieu - fine for boiling water or heating up small meals but not for frying - so no more pancakes for time being... Might have another tank with some propane in it in gas locker but too busy to investigate just now. Trying to get to radio connections - not easy...

8:45pm - On a much better course now - but still very slow - making just under 2kt on a course of 120T. Sunset a short while ago - air temperature definitely dropping and slight dew on deck. Hope it doesn't get foggy - have no working radar, although AIS is a good substitute out here, well away from land.

Had a very nice simple supper of wild salmon with sweetcorn and a dollop of mayonnaise. With no gas to the galley cooker now, even though I have my back-up camping burner, it's simpler to enjoy a cold meal.

Have had to move a lot of gear out of the way in the aft cabin before removing bunk tops in order to get at the wooden panels that must be removed to reach the tuner and connections to the antenna. Having to check back on deck regularly with the wind shifting, to make sure we're on the best possible course, checking weather forecasts also, takes time out from achieving as much as hoped - tomorrow it should be possible to look at the possible problem area - hope it's below decks and not above!

Have been tuning in to my usual Nets - and has been good to hear almost everyone very clearly - they've even talked to me and sent me messages, knowing I can hear them!

Midnight (Sun 0700 GMT) - Starry but hazy sky with lots of stars visible and a chilly feel to the air.

Trimmed sails for beam reach - speed increased satisfyingly. Wind has backed a lot now - to N, or nearly so. We're actually headed for the Strait entrance directly now - first time for several days, I think. Cape Flattery is now 280 miles off.

9am - PDT Solid grey overcast sky, air feeling cool, decks wet - from overnight rain or dew? Making fair speed in NNE wind, still well on course for Cape Flattery. Should be able to stay on rhumb-line course for the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca from now on since wind is expected to stay in N quadrant. Cape Flattery is just under three days away, although light winds will make that time longer - presently only making 3.5-4kt.

11.45am - Wind just came up - now making around 5kt, instead of 2.5kt just before - 'wind under cloud' effect, possibly - lots of grey cloud everywhere. Only problem with increased speed is the increased heeling and banging into seas that goes with it - difficult to work on radio problem just now... Must wait for calmer conditions.

ETA: Thursday is looking possible... (Ask the weather gods that have sent these light winds to slow us down...)

DTF: Victoria Hbr (Ogden Pt breakwater): 291 n.ml.; Cape Flattery (~60n.ml. from Victoria Hbr entrance): 231 n.ml to ESE

1900GMT = midday PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) - end of Day 333. We made 61 n.ml. DMG, measured in a straight line between the two 1900GMT positions. Very light wind until this morning. Actually sailed over 67 n.ml. but changes in course with windshifts make for less than that in distance gained.

Total distance covered from Victoria, B.C., to end of Day 333 (by daily DMGs): 27,592 n.ml.

Position, as posted to www.Winlink.org and www.Shiptrak.org (go to either of those websites with my US radio callsign, KC2IOV, to see my track over this entire voyage:

Time: 2019/09/01 19:00GMT
Latitude: 49-01.62N
Longitude: 130-33.98W
Course: 097T
Speed: 5.0kt
Wind Speed: 12kt
Wind Dir: NNE
Swell Dir: NNE
Swell HT: 2.0m
Clouds: 100%
Baro: 1013.6hPa
Trend: 2
Air Temp: 22.0C
Sea Temp: 22.0C
Comment: Wind just came up after slow progress beforehand

This article has been provided by the courtesy of the S/V Nereida.

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