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Just wandering

by John Curnow, Editor, Sail-WorldCruising.com 15 Oct 2019 22:00 UTC
Just wandering. Not a care about polars or VMG - just as it should be for a good day cruising... © John Curnow

Sitting down beside the Richmond River, just before it goes on to meet the Tasman Sea, I allowed myself the time to wander. For sure I was seated, so the meandering was taking place purely in that space that is nearly as good for you as deep sleep. Yet as the guy in the boat pictured here made his way inexorably up to, and then past me (which was not brisk at all BTW) I got to contemplate many a thing from health to possibility, the state of play around the globe, then opportunity and finally off to change. Yes. That certainly is some wandering...

You know I even found time to investigate what one could do to the vessel in question to make its progress faster. More appropriate. In that is the very question, however. Why would you do that? In fact is there any point? Could it even be possible given its steel construction, hull form, and undeniable mass? Is the whole scenario not exactly the very reason for its being in the first place? Its very purpose? I feel it is. And that would be to sit down. Shut up. And take a load off...

Stemming from all of that, I got to review the genesis of this here editorial. Sad, and maybe I am a sick puppy, but yes, I started thinking about work. Since taking over the role of Editor here at Sail-WorldCruising.com I have been very keen to look at the world we so love to go out and see from the sea (fully intended), and our impacts on it. It is a vision shared by our Managing Editor, Mark Jardine, and we are very proud of what has been achieved and the way you have received the mission. Indeed, it has been interesting to watch many others in the space follow our lead.

To do so we have sought the best material on the environment, the technology around that allows us to minimise how our boats are made, and what we leave behind. There are the many and varied species we co-exist with, the changes that are documented, and the multitude of souls out there either exploring what is going on, researching what can be done, or providing intel for others to go about their ways, all of them causing the least issues to our planet.

A big thank you is sent to all who fit into the above categories, whether they be scientists, philanthropists, or concerned citizens. Whenever you name one or more individuals or groups you'll always miss some. I apologise instantly if anyone is disappointed by not seeing their name here, but certainly people like Lisa Benckhuysen, and Mission Océan come to mind immediately, and then GBRMPA, NOAA, and Woods Hole.

In the midst of a thing called life, which in the modern world is something entirely new and unique, they demonstrate what commitment and purpose can do. Indeed life can get in the way of your greater plans, but as Laura Beard and Henrique Agostinho prove, you can always have another bite of the cherry. They have had to leave the boat once more to go back and work for a while. Still, with her sitting on Tahiti, there will always be more than enough motivation to get back to exploring the seas.

Back to the original thread now, which is to remain true to our original premise, as stated at the bottom of every editorial we have ever written. Namely, looking after the very seas we love to cruise. In my world, both professionally and personally, it seems like a day cannot go past without someone getting excited about some climate statement or another message. I saw only ten days ago that a baby sea turtle had been found dead, with 150 pieces of plastic inside it. And yes, the prevention of this type of thing is exactly what we are trying to promote, as per the above.

Don't get me wrong. Impassioned pleas from Greta Thunberg are fantastic. Yet, when people hold climate strikes, and show up in smoky old cars that clog the roads for all and sundry, making yet more of an issue for the trees in an already burning out of control Amazon jungle to deal with, then questions need to be asked. Please start with chatting to the one in the mirror if you would.

Now I have always had issues with the Paris Accords. Not because we don't need to do something about our unwavering faith in unsustainable and unquestioned economic growth for growth's sake alone, but because it seems the realities have gone off on a permanent strike all of their own.

Now until recently, I had not been able to get a comprehensive statement on the questions that bugged me. Then a very learned friend of mine sent me this video, itself produced by another PhD laureate. It contained some truths about the big business of climate. Exactly what we need! Watch Dr. Shiva Ayyadurai's video for yourself. It answered many questions for me. Perhaps so too for you. More than ever, the well trod notion of 'Think Global. Act Local' seems to be the only way forward. And yes, we at Sail-World remain committed to the environment, as well as also the truth.

Nature leading by example (as always)

Many times we have seen that the answer can be right before us. I think immediately of the 'antifoul' film or carpet for ships that we featured in Well I am... that resembles a sea urchin.

Recently, and at almost the exact same time as each other, a press release for a SUP came across my desk, and then these jellyfish appeared regularly on the beach the dogs and I walk on. The former are continuing to become ever popular, and I see them tied to the fence on nearly every cruising cat I come across. They are great for low-impact eco-tourism, as well as overall fitness. The latter have been with us in one form or another for ages.

The similarities were as distinct as they were astounding. "How brilliant," I had thought when I saw the SUP that you saw through to investigate nature and its creatures, just like the very one that had seemed to give its secret to the world in order for this product to be created.

On paper, Le StandUp by Loeva could have almost fallen into its own hyperbole. Comments like, "The transparent board was a dream, a myth. It is now a reality," would help with that. Yet the actuality is there for all to see, literally. The SUP weighs just 20 kilograms, is near enough to 3.3m long, and has three hours of running time for the inbuilt, double row of LEDs under the board. They can light the seabed at night for up to 15m to provide you with yet another maritime experience.

As a mark to the total forethought into the product, Le StandUp's creators, Vanessa Pretotto and Laurent Jaurey even included an international adapter as standard with your ready-to-go package.

Yet it is the removal of that barrier between observer and the marine life that remains the key element. At night the marine life is attracted to the light source, and colours are contrasted against the darkness. As they call it, 'A window on the ocean'. The unmatched clarity is made possible by a nano-structured, innovative and patented material that is not overtly fragile.

Even the fin takes its inspiration from a dolphin, counter-rotating for every stroke, before returning to neutral once more. Best of all it is made without resins or solvents. "Nature is perfection, it's our inspiration." Well for that alone they got the mention here, as it certainly shows us that bio-tech can be beneficial in so many ways. Each board sold even includes a component that goes to help Reefscapers regenerate our vulnerable corals. Investigate it for yourself at www.loeva.me

Classics continue to inspire

The 43-footer seen here, Cirrus, was built in 1930 and is a product of the genius that was Nathanael G. and A. Sidney DeWolfe Herreshoff. Her second custodian had her for 50 years no less, made her red, and also gave her the Joel White yawl rig to make her easier to handle. In 2004 she had new timber for her keel, frames and sole. Recently I spotted that she is for sale to allow someone else to feel the magic. I get it. I have a friend who is the present steward of the most magnificent 8m, and she just about cries when talking about her. Email away if Cirrus sounds like you...

Today you will find that we have information for you about the Down Under Rally for Cruisers, coral in the Maldives, Randall Reeves and his incredible Figure of Eight, World ARC in the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Phillippe Briand shows us what self-sufficient can look like, The Ocean Cleanup is working, Vanuatu with Andrew and Clare Payne, Lisa Benckhuysen in Fiji (a must read), Hugh and Heather Bacon in the Gulf of Aden, Sailing in Chile, Indonesia, in the Cayman Islands with Mission Ocean, Panama Canal, Bahamas post devastation, 60 years since the first multihull Transat, Sweden's West Coast, sailing around Britain, as well as much more below.

So you see, there are stories, lessons, inspirations and history to regale yourself with. Please do savour... We're really enjoying bringing you the best stories from all over the globe. If you want to add to that, then please make contact with us via email.

Remember too, if you want to see what is happening in the other Hemisphere, go to the top of the Sail-WorldCruising home page and the drag down menu on the right, select the other half of the globe and, voila, it's all there for you.

In the meantime, do you love being on the ocean? Well remember to love them back too. They need our help. Now more than ever! Until next time...

John Curnow
Editor, Sail-WorldCruising.com

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