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Sailing Holidays 2019 - TOP

Jeanne Socrates honoured in Victoria, BC

by Shaun Peck 29 Nov 2019 01:45 UTC 21 November 2019
Jeanne Socrates received recognition for her amazing voyage © Shaun Peck

A dock was named after her and plaque unveiled to mark the completion of her remarkable circumnavigation solo, nonstop, unassisted.

There was a ceremony on November 21st 2019 when Jeanne Socrates received recognition for her amazing non-stop unassisted under sail only round the world voyage to be the eldest person (she is now 77) to complete the voyage to and from Victoria, BC.

The Victoria Harbour Authority has named a dock in her honour and a plaque was unveiled. Her vessel Nereida is about to undergo significant repairs for much of the damage that occurred to her. As Jeanne said, "I was not injured but it was Nereida that suffered many damaged systems that caused the voyage to take a long time and uncertainty as to whether she would finally be able to complete the voyage."

Daragh Nagle OCC Port Officer, Victoria and Ian Grant Regional Rear Commodore OCC are shown with the OCC flag below the sign on the dock in Victoria Harbour acknowledging Jeanne's remarkable voyage.

This article has been provided by the courtesy of Ocean Cruising Club.

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